ACCA - The global body for professional accountants
For ACCA, the touchstone of the audit reform has always been about ensuring well-structured audit services, which can be trusted and which can also bring the most value to businesses and the end-users of these services. Audit is only one part of this jigsaw: further progress could for instance be made through enhancing both corporate governance and reporting, namely through non-financial and also integrated reporting. Their development would help reflecting the interconnected nature of economic and financial performance with environmental, social and governance factors
—Sue Almond, technical director, ACCA

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) welcomes today’s vote on MEP Karim’s report on the audit package in the European Parliament’s Legal Affairs (JURI) Committee and commends the compromise efforts of the rapporteurs and shadow rapporteurs

The global accountancy body now hopes that a reasonable agreement can be reached with the Council and urges the Irish Presidency and the Member States not to lose sight of the main objectives of the audit reform: improving audit quality and striking the right balance between reinstating stakeholders’ – especially investors’ -  confidence and a competitive environment for businesses.

Sue Almond, Technical Director at ACCA says: 'It is crucial that audit meets the demands of the business world, including those of management, investors and shareholders. Future legislation needs to be workable for businesses while enhancing investors’ confidence. The JURI report prepared by MEP Sajjad Karim reaches a laudable balance, which was not an easy task given the diverging opinions, especially on the controversial issues linked to market structure.' 

Sue Almond explains: 'We are particularly pleased with the compromise reached on the role of the Audit Committee. ACCA is a long-standing advocate of strengthening this key body. It is ideally placed to assess the independence and suitability of the external auditor, to make a recommendation for the selection - or renewal - process of the auditor, as well as an informed and transparent decision on the tendering process in the context of the business needs. It is appropriate for the audit committee to provide more transparency, namely in providing the rationale for change - or not - of the auditor on the basis of the ‘comply or explain’ principle. The 25-year backstop auditor rotation position should provide added impetus for audit committees to exercise their role, without being so intrusive that it undermines their responsibility.'

In addition, the JURI report rightly suggests that the Audit Committee should be able to critically assess and approve the provision of additional non-prohibited non-audit services. We believe that the proposed new list of prohibited non-audit services, which is substantially in line with international standards, is sufficiently exhaustive to ensure that independence of the auditor is not threatened, Sue Almond adds.

Sue Almond notes: 'We also welcome the enhancement of the accountability of the external auditor to the audit committee along with suggestions for improved shareholder-auditor engagement. 

ACCA is also very pleased with the JURI Committee’s call for audit reports of public interest entities - the so called PIES - to be prepared in accordance with the international auditing standards adopted by the European Union.

'Consistency with international standards is essential, though there is room for improvement at EU level. It is encouraging to see that the compromise text concentrates on the key areas that investors have highlighted. But investors consistently note that they invest globally and so international comparability of audit reports is critical. The International Audit and Assurance Standards Board (IAASB) is engaged in a major project to revise the audit report to increase its communication value, which we support. At ACCA we believe that extended auditor reporting will improve transparency between auditors and investors and help articulate the value of the audit,' Sue Almond points out. 

Sue Almond concludes: 'For ACCA, the touchstone of the audit reform has always been about ensuring well-structured audit services, which can be trusted and which can also bring the most value to businesses and the end-users of these services. Audit is only one part of this jigsaw: further progress could for instance be made through enhancing both corporate governance and reporting, namely through non-financial and also integrated reporting. Their development would help reflecting the interconnected nature of economic and financial performance with environmental, social and governance factors.'

-ends- 

For more information, please contact:

Cecile Bonino, ACCA Brussels
+32(0) 2 286 11 37
Cecile.bonino@accaglobal.com

Notes to editors 

  1. ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) is the global body for professional accountants. We aim to offer business-relevant, first-choice qualifications to people of application, ability and ambition around the world who seek a rewarding career in accountancy, finance and management. 
  2. We support our 154,000 members and 432,000 students in 170 countries, helping them to develop successful careers in accounting and business, with the skills required by employers. We work through a network of over 80 offices and centres and more than 8,400 Approved Employers worldwide, who provide high standards of employee learning and development. Through our public interest remit, we promote appropriate regulation of accounting and conduct relevant research to ensure accountancy continues to grow in reputation and influence. 
  3. Founded in 1904, ACCA has consistently held unique core values: opportunity, diversity, innovation, integrity and accountability. We believe that accountants bring value to economies in all stages of development and seek to develop capacity in the profession and encourage the adoption of global standards. Our values are aligned to the needs of employers in all sectors and we ensure that through our qualifications, we prepare accountants for business. We seek to open up the profession to people of all backgrounds and remove artificial barriers, innovating our qualifications and delivery to meet the diverse needs of trainee professionals and their employers.