ACCA - The global body for professional accountants
HMRC is essentially reminding late payers that they need to make a return and they need to make a payment. Late returns attract a penalty charge of £100 for the relevant tax year, plus another £100 for returns that are still outstanding six months later. The tax owed also attracts interest charges and other surcharges, so it makes sense to be on time and meet the tax deadlines
—Chas Roy-Chowdhury, head of taxation, ACCA

New scheme from HMRC targets tax self-assessment late payers

Self-assessment taxpayers who are not up-to-date on their tax returns should take advantage of a new campaign from HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) called the Tax Return Initiative, says Chas Roy-Chowdhury, head of tax at ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants). 

Mr Roy-Chowdhury explains: 'This is a good scheme from HMRC. It’s a new initiative which aims to give self-assessors the chance to get their tax affairs organised and to pay the tax they owe HMRC. If self-assessors have received a tax demand for 2009–10 or earlier and they haven’t made a return, then they need to opt into this new scheme and let HMRC know that they intend to take part.'

HMRC says that to take part in their Tax Return Initiative self-assessors will need to complete an online form and send it to HMRC either online or by post. They then need to complete and submit their late tax return with a payment of what is owed – tax and national insurance contributions - or indeed claim any repayment that might be due. The deadline is 2 October 2012.

Chas Roy Chowdhury concludes: 'HMRC is essentially reminding late payers that they need to make a return and they need to make a payment. Late returns attract a penalty charge of £100 for the relevant tax year, plus another £100 for returns that are still outstanding six months later. The tax owed also attracts interest charges and other surcharges, so it makes sense to be on time and meet the tax deadlines. 

'HMRC also says that payment terms can be organised if someone cannot afford to pay what they owe all at once.'

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For more information, please contact:

Chas Roy-Chowdhury, head of tax, ACCA +44(0)7710 707516

Helen Thompson, ACCA Newsroom
+44 (0)20 7059 5759
+44 (0)7725 498654
helen.thompson@accaglobal.com 

Notes to Editors

  1. Further details about the HMRC campaign can be found via the 'Related Links' section, left of this article
  2. ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) is the global body for professional accountants. We aim to offer business-relevant, first-choice qualifications to people of application, ability and ambition around the world who seek a rewarding career in accountancy, finance and management. 
  3. We support our 154,000 members and 432,000 students in 170 countries, helping them to develop successful careers in accounting and business, with the skills required by employers. We work through a network of over 80 offices and centres and more than 8,400 Approved Employers worldwide, who provide high standards of employee learning and development. Through our public interest remit, we promote appropriate regulation of accounting and conduct relevant research to ensure accountancy continues to grow in reputation and influence. 
  4. Founded in 1904, ACCA has consistently held unique core values: opportunity, diversity, innovation, integrity and accountability. We believe that accountants bring value to economies in all stages of development and seek to develop capacity in the profession and encourage the adoption of global standards. Our values are aligned to the needs of employers in all sectors and we ensure that through our qualifications, we prepare accountants for business. We seek to open up the profession to people of all backgrounds and remove artificial barriers, innovating our qualifications and delivery to meet the diverse needs of trainee professionals and their employers.